Europe

Day 5: Seville through Míriam

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That Saturday promised to be intense. To start, we had breakfast in the cafeteria bar next to the hotel, with a voucher that we were given in the same hotel (paying, yes) for breakfast. The plan for the morning was to visit the Royal Alcazars of Seville. On the way we walked through the Santa Cruz neighborhood, one of the places I remembered from my previous visit for its charm. It is another one of those neighborhoods for which it is a pleasure to get lost, among the white houses and a color reminiscent of saffron, like the land of Seville.

The Royal Alcazars in Seville

Finally we arrive at the entrance door to the Alcazares. Again I was speechless with Islamic and Mudejar architecture. The vault of the Hall of Ambassadors is beautiful, the decoration of the arches with geometric and floral motifs, the Patio de las Doncellas… I also liked the tiles that decorated some rooms. Precisely we found a small room where there was an exhibition of tiles of various styles. In another room we could see a private collection of fans from different eras and places in the world. And then we found some hidden stairs and, without knowing it, we reached the first floor. Our entrance was not worth visiting the first floor, so, unintentionally, we sneaked in. We could see the Tapestry Room, where you can see several tapestries, one of which shows the Mediterranean seen from the north.

Gardens of the Royal Alcazares

Then we went for a walk in the gardens, full of well-loaded orange trees that gave off a special aroma. First we entered the little maze and it was fun to get lost in his hedges. Then we rest on one of the garden benches. It was not sunny, but the temperature and atmosphere was very pleasant, so we stayed there for a little while. But soon it was time to meet my friends, so we returned quietly through the Grutesco Gallery, from where there is a beautiful perspective of the Gardens and the Alcazar.

Tapestries in the RR AA

Upon leaving, we briefly saw the Doña María de Padilla Bath, which is a little hidden because it is underground. At 1:30 we meet Carmelo and Mariló in the Plaza de la Encarnación. There you can see some very controversial works in Seville, which correspond to the construction of the Metropol Parasol, popularly known as "mushrooms" for its shape, which totally breaks the aesthetics of that area of ​​the city.

As we were hungry, we started our tapas route, which promised a lot! On the way to the first bar we pass through the streets where the flamenco dresses are. These stores are not for tourists, but they are where Sevillanas buy their costumes for the Fair, and the truth ... is that they look level! There are traditional and other innovative suits. Every year fashion changes, and it must be taken into account!


The first place we visited was El Rinconcito. I was crowded, but my friends immediately found a "little corner" at the bar where I ordered the first tapas. El Rinconcito is one of those bars where waiters make accounts on the same wooden bar with chalk. They are cracks when it comes to remembering everything and making the sums! We had a top of spinach and chickpeas very good (specialty of the house), some pavements (breaded cod) and tortilla. We started very well! We did not stay long, because we had to continue with the route. On the way, we passed through a square where you could see a lot of people with their beer. There was a lot of atmosphere!

Ambience in the streets of Seville

Spinach with chickpeas from El Rinconcito

The second place was probably the most picturesque, because it is a small farm called Casa Moreno where they serve montaditos in a kind of bounce. Here we already thought that we could not joke, but thanks to the expertise of my friends we managed to find a square span in the bar where they could serve us. I had a spectacular little pigeon waffle with cabrales! The walls of the place were packed with pictures of bullfighters and virgins, among others, and wines and spirits filled the shelves. It was hard to get in, but it was even harder to get out!

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