Europe

Kicking Madrid. What to see in a day in Madrid

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Poor Madrid, how it turned out after we stepped on it VERY WELL FOUND for six hours of hard wandering and seeing things. Let's go there. We left Atocha and I was surprised by a strange building that looked ahead. We went there and it turned out to be the Reina Sofía Museum. Ahead we saw a tourist information stand where a kind lady from Jaén with an Extremadura accent provided us with a map of the city and the general area to go to see interesting things (basically she pointed out where we were and surrounded the Palace area with a pen Real). I wonder if they send all the tourists there because there is more space or if, as they arrive, they are sent to different tourist areas to congest the capital less.

Chocolate with churros in the mythical San Ginés

Anyway, we went up a long street until we reached the Congress of Deputies and along the way we saw a CaixaForum museum with a peculiar facade made from living plants. We made a mental note that there was an exhibition about an artist that we like very much (Alfonse Mucha) and we continue walking.

CaixaForum in Madrid

After the Congress we arrived by the Race of San Jerónimo (by the sidewalk with shade) until the Square of the Sun, that was in works (the Madrid people say that, in summer, the mayor looks for treasures by the city). We cross the Plaza looking at the Ham Museum (although there are many) and continue along the main street. At this point, we realize that the basic essence in terms of ancient architecture in Madrid is the houses with narrow balconies and the same white painted frame plus a tiled roof. Very pretty.

The main square

We were looking for a churrería where to have breakfast, since, to all this, they had just given 10 in the morning (!). Its exact whereabouts were not clear but, following the traveling intuition, we found it very fast. In the Churrería de San Ginés we made a technical stop to fill our stomach with good thick chocolate and batons. There is a plaque at the entrance, according to which, Max Estrella passes through this place in the novel Bohemian lights from Valle-Inclán.

The Plaza de Oriente

Satisfied, we resumed the march and arrived in just a few steps to the Plaza Mayor, which is very wide and very impressive. Then we chose to follow almost randomly one of the multiple streets that start from this square and we run into the Collegiate Church of San Isidro, a church of these baroque and ornate ones. Then we pass casually in front of the Taberna del Tuerto of Captain Alatriste's novels, and then another curious tavern: The Taberna de las Conspiraciones, where "varied conspiracies, among other dishes" are served. The two closed, of course, because after all we were in August.

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