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Pisac ruins tour from Cuzco

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Presiding over the imposing Urubamba Valley, the ruins of the citadel of Pisac, located on top of a hill. It was there that we decided to go that day. After breakfast, we walked to the bus station on Tullumayo Avenue. We got on one that was not very large and had little space between seats. In addition, the bus was stopping every time someone wanted to get on, so that the 33 kilometers that separate Cuzco from Pisac became a bit heavy. But anyway, we were excited for what we were going to see.

Upon reaching the town of Pisac, there are two ways to climb the 13 kilometers to the ruins: on foot or by taxi. On the bus we agreed with a Chinese girl with whom we decided to share the taxi to the ruins. He price is set at 25 soles and, once up, each one went his way.

At the entrance to the premises there were some vendors and my partner decided to buy a hat because he had forgotten it at the hostel. I didn't wear a hat that day either, but I didn't buy any because, although it was a bright sun, since I was wearing a long sleeve I thought it wouldn't burn me. Big mistake! Look that the saleswoman repeated that I bought the hat, that it only cost 10 soles (€ 3) and that the sun was very harmful there ... but I don't even care. Do you want to know how I finished the day? Well, at the end of the story I tell you.

The Pisac ruins They are impressive, they are perched on top of a very high hill, flanked by two ravines and surrounded by innumerable terraces that make it a striped skirt. The Incas used these stepped terraces to be able to have more crops and more variety. In fact, Pisac has the basic structure of the Inca city, which consists of several nuclei scattered along the crest of the hills, with terraces, houses and stone temples. It is believed that Pisac was a farm that belonged to the Inca Pachacutec.

At the top of the site is the Intihuatana, a temple dedicated to the sun with a "berth" for the king star. The Incas believed that if they tied the sun to the temple post, they would make it come back after winter and thus it would not disappear forever. The entire area surrounding the temple is a maze of buildings to which you have to spend a good time to explore it well.

We continue through the ruins in the direction of the town, crossing doors built in the middle of the road with a millimeter perfection. About 30 minutes walk, we reach the area of Kallaqasa, in which we find some rectangular constructions with very good finishes. The curious thing about Inca constructions is that doors, windows and walls always they have a trapezoidal shape to prevent earthquakes from easily collapsing them. In addition, in this area of ​​the ruins surprise the canalization systems through which the water still runs.

After the visit to the site, we started our way back. It was two o'clock at noon and we didn't want to get to town too late to eat. The way down has great views of the valley and is not very complicated, but when going down at a good pace came a point where my legs began to falter. After a long hour on the way, and when we were about to reach the town, we met an English couple, whose name I can't remember, with whom we were chatting for a while while we rested. It was the first of a series of chance encounters that were repeated by the different points of interest in the country.

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