Asia

New Delhi in one day

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Everything comes to an end and that day was our last day of Travel to India. To end our Indian journey, we decided to leave the great capital for the end, although a somewhat decaf visit was planned. He January 26, Republic Day is celebrated and, being a holiday, all shops and businesses are closed and the streets are empty.

We got up a little late and, after breakfast, closed our bags, put them in the Ambassador and we started towards Swaminarayan Akshardham. The thing was that we visited another temple thinking it was that one (but it was actually Birla Mandir), and the worst part is that we didn't realize it. I do not know if there was a communication problem or if the driver decided to take us to any temple so as not to have to take us to the outskirts. Enric and Marta had recommended me to visit the Swaminarayan Akshardham for being one of the most sacred in the city and also because it has a shop to buy souvenirs that also sell in the Natura but at Indian prices. Too bad, next time it will be.

He Qutb Minar It dates from the first years of Islamism in India and what stands out most of the whole enclosure is the Qutb minaret that is 73 meters high. The whole enclosure is built in sandstone and has very beautiful engravings. It also has painfully low doors where I gave myself one, if not two blows to the head.

The streets of Delhi were deserted and in the few open monuments there were hardly any visitors inside, so the displacements from one monument to another were very fast, but we had the feeling of being in a somewhat unreal city, nothing to do with the daily life .

He Lotus temple It's a bit strange. It has the shape of a semi-open lotus flower (national flower of India) and a long queue of visitors awaiting their turn to enter. So that order and Zen stay, there were some volunteers to make sure that one kept silence and row.

When we finally got inside the temple, we didn't know what to do there. It is supposed to be a place for meditation and concord of religions, but perhaps we did not have the "on" meditation mode. The temple inside is quite neutral, pulling ugly. It is like a church built at the end of the 20th century.

One of the things that showed me the most about Delhi was that people have no qualms about throwing you inquisitive glances, it's like when we were lining up to pick up the shoes at the lotus temple, or like when we were leaving, that all the queue visitors They stared at us and made us feel a little uncomfortable.

However, in the Humayun's Tomb We feel the sea of ​​good for its beauty and the tranquility that is breathed. It is worth paying the 250 rupees of the entrance to enjoy an early Mongolian architecture reminiscent of Taj Mahal. The tomb was built for Haji Begum, wife of Emperor Humayun in the 16th century.

The tomb is surrounded by gardens and ponds and has been declared a world heritage site. There were few people there and it was quieter than in the lotus temple. Even so, people were still approaching us to ask if they could take pictures or if they could take one with us. That was a constant of the trip that reached its maximum exponent in the Jama Masjid.

The Jama Masjid It is the largest mosque in all of India, where 25,000 faithful can meet. To enter we have to pay 200 rupees and they forced us to wear a tunic despite going with long pants and long sleeves, so our visit there did not start with a good footing.

The mosque is in the area known as Old Delhi, the old part of the city, and was built between 1644 and 1658. To climb the stairs leading to the prayer areas you have to take off your shoes. As a general rule, people carried them in their hand or in plastic bags, but they made us leave them at the entrance. Perhaps our footwear was more impure than the rest. Sonia went from leaving them out and did not enter. I took off my shoes, but while I was inside I didn't feel comfortable because everyone looked at me in a way that I didn't like, so it didn't take me long to return to Sonia.

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