America

From Puno to the Colca Canyon

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When we prepare the trip to Peru, we organize the route backwards than usual, that is, starting with the Macchu Picchu instead of leaving it for last. We thought it would be better to be fresh for the visit to the sacred Valley and its treasures However, we discovered that it was difficult to find public transportation that goes from Puno to the Colca Canyon area. Instead, it was quite easy and affordable. go from the Colca canyon to Arequipa, both by public transport and organized excursions, but not from Puno.


After searching for information on other blogs, I saw that both Cotters as Sandar's travels they had stayed in the Killawasi Lodge in Yanque, in the Colca Canyon, and when inquiring on the hotel website I discovered that they had a package that was not badly priced: three days around the area leaving Puno and ending in Arequipa. So we decided to take some minivacations of the trip and let Guillermo, from Killawasi Lodge I will organize them.

That morning they told us that transportation would come to our hotel in Puno after six, but we did not expect it to be a 60-seater coach for us alone, and with a guide included! In addition, on the way between Puno and Chivay, in the Colca Valley, we were going to make some stops to get to know the region a little better. What a rush!

The first stop on the itinerary was the lagoon of the Lagunillas (redundant name where available) in which they can be seen flamingos in the distance. Later, the stop was to spot the Chucura volcano and we also go through the Aguada Blanca National Reserve, where vicuñas abound, a kind of protected flame, since its wool is so soft that it has been hunted too much and is now on the verge of extinction.

Gradually, the road was ascending and at each stop it became more difficult to breathe and the terrain was more barren. The landscape that we contemplate in the Patapampa volcano viewpoint, located almost 5000 meters above sea level, was extraterrestrial. It was as if the atmosphere pushed you to the ground. It was hard to move and breathe at the same time. And what made the landscape more Martian were the hundreds of apachetas around us, a pile of stacked stones erected by all who had stopped there as proof of their passage.

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