America

Route through the Quebrada de Humahuaca

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We continue with the stories of travel to Argentina. In this article we leave Patagonia to go to the warm region of Jump to visit the Humahuaca.

After a brief stopover in Buenos Aires, our flight landed at the small airport of Salta. We were waiting for five days to discover all the wonders of this region that we decided to visit in two parts: the first one we would travel by car to the province of Jujuy in two days and the second part we would base in the beautiful city of Salta to make several excursions for three days .

In the same airport we had reserved a small car with Avis_Spain and without much delay we headed to the Humahuaca. To get there you can go on Highway 9, which is a scenic road but full of curves or you can go on Highway 34 via General Guelmes. From Salta airport it took almost four hours to arrive because the road was under construction.

The landscapes of the Quebrada are exceptional, arid, with mountains of reddish and earthy colors dotted with cacti that triple the human height. The Quebrada de Humahuaha runs along the road between the villages of Volcán a Tres Cruces, one hour from the border with Bolivia.

To visit the Quebrada de Humahuaca it is best to base on Tilcara, a beautiful and small colonial population with various charming corners. We stayed at the hotel Antigua Tilcara Hostel, a hotel near the town square that we liked very much. Unlike Patagonia, where we had to wear winter coats, it was so hot in Quebrada that we had to go in short sleeves.

We took a walk through Tilcara, enjoying the atmosphere, and we went to eat at the Kusikanki restaurant, a place that we were recommended in the hotel for having local and vegetarian dishes. I took a Milanese flame that was superb. The atmosphere is much more relaxed and quieter, there are not as many tourists as in El Calafate or Ushuaia, and the prices are also much cheaper.

When the sun stopped squeezing, we went up to Pucará, the archaeological zone of Tilcara. Remember to wear a hat and water because there are very few areas of shade in the enclosure. At the base of the hill there is a room where an explanatory video can be seen. Then you have to climb the slope. Here stood a village of the Tilcara tribe, a pre-Hispanic town, and from the highest point the entire valley is dominated. The views are spectacular.

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