Europe

A day in Malaga

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At 8.30 o'clock, Susana and Roser came to find me in my room. We had stayed for breakfast together and entered the restaurant hoping to meet the fourth guest to the trip blog. As we talked about who it could be, Esther de Miss Travel He approached us and introduced himself.

He planning for that day it was very complete and at 9.15 am we had been summoned at the hotel reception. There we were very punctual with Daniel, María, who would be our guide that morning, and Victoria de Next trip, who joined the group until noon.

We begin the guided tour in the Cathedral of the Incarnation, in what would be the historic center of Malaga. The cathedral was built between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries on the old mosque and its facade should be noted that one of the two towers is missing. We did not enter inside (by the way, the ticket is worth 4 euros), but we walked through the center towards the Picasso Museum.

In fact, I have to admit that until just before stepping on the Cathedral Square, I thought that Malaga was being a churro (as a city, of course), but when I saw the colorful and the lordship of the downtown buildings, I swallowed my thoughts Because I loved it.

We continue walking and we went through streets full of names of saints until we reached the Picasso museum. The museum is located in the Buenavista Palace, from the 16th century, and where the restored Mudejar architecture stands out. In addition, while remodeling the palace to house the museum, they discovered in the basement Phoenician, Roman, Arab and jars remains dating from the times of its construction, which can now be visited.

Pablo Picasso was born in Malaga on October 25, 1881 and, although he wanted his hometown to house some of his works, it was not until 1996 when the widow of Picasso's son started it again. The museum was inaugurated in 2003 and houses 233 works that review his career, from the beginning to its monochromatic stages, and also includes some pieces of pottery.

It was the first time I went to a Picasso Museum, despite having one in Barcelona, ​​and what surprised me the most were the portraits of his women, who had to have a really bad time with him because of the disengagement of their faces. Pablo Picasso was a man with a very strong character who had an influence, not always positive, on the whole world around him. Sexuality and women are very present in their work.

After visiting the museum, we went to the new city museum. He Carmen Thyssen Museum is located in the Villalón Palace. The collection consists of 358 works in which the Spanish and Andalusian painting of the s. XIX has a great importance. In the museum we can enjoy works by Sorolla, Zurbarán and Julio Romero de Torres, as The good adventure.

The museum, which opened recently, still has some empty rooms and the restaurant and shop are still open. However, it has audio guides to make a complete tour of the entire exhibition.

Upon leaving the museum, we walked to the Constitution Plaza to visit the mythical Central Coffee. The best thing to visit the old town of Malaga is to look up and enjoy the windows of the buildings. They are made with watermarks that wrap the crystals and stand out with the color of their facades.

The Central Café opened its doors in 1897, but what is currently there is the result of the acquisition and expansion of the business successively until 1968. Ignacio Prado, third generation of Café owners sat down with us at the Coffee table. that the coffee legend explained to us. But do not think that now I will tell you a story with unicorns and magic potions, because the legend refers to the graphic of how to order coffee made of tiles that are on one of the walls. Don José Prado Crespo, tired of never getting his clients exactly how they wanted coffee, created an ideogram with all types and named it. So now we have from black, long, semi-long and just short to reach the coffee cloud or directly to "do not wear it" (how horny). There are ten ways to serve coffee that have made Café Central unique.

After the stop, we continue walking until the Alcazaba, which was once the palace where the Muslim rulers of Malaga lived. It was built mostly in the eleventh century and access to the palace was especially complicated by the recesses made by the wall in order to hinder the assault. It was so impossible to assault, that the Catholic Monarchs simply besieged it by cutting off the supply of water and food and quietly waited for the defenders to surrender, which happened on August 18, 1487.

The Alcazaba is very careful and from the top you can enjoy a beautiful view of the sea and the port of Malaga. The Alcazaba enclosure also has a Roman theater of the third century, but this can be seen from the street without paying the entrance fee, since they have integrated it as another element of the urban landscape of the city.

It was almost two o'clock and it was time to eat. To do this, we had prepared a gastronomic route through three of the most emblematic restaurants in the city. We start with him Mariano, restaurant located in the Plaza del Carbon. Jesus Gracia, commercial director of the Entreplatos group, greeted us there and explained that the restaurant is also called “the artist's corner”. The place has a clean and neutral decoration that makes it ideal to enjoy meals in good company.

We sat on the terrace, as it was sunny and wanted to enjoy the historic center while we tasted the first tapas of the route. In the Mariano we ate you live with ham and oxtail croquettes. Personally, I am nothing fan of the habitats, but those of Mariano are so good and tender that I loved them. The oxtail croquettes were also exquisite. The restaurant's specialty is not tapas, but rather paellas and fish. Among the clientele were many foreign tourists, some of them just disembarking from the numerous cruise ships that are beginning to arrive in the city.

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