Africa

Visiting Susa's medina

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At that point of the trip, already I had seen several medinas, like that of Kairouan and Mahdia, which may be one of the best northern tunisia. Maybe for this reason, when we visit Susa's walled medina, What is it Heritage of humanity by unesco, I was surprised that it left me so cold and that is that, honestly, I found it artificial. But you better start at the beginning.

That morning we left the hotel in Port el Kantaoui and spent the few hours we had left in that area to explore the medina of the city of Susa. From the Port el Kantaoui you can reach the same door of the medina by bus line (No. 18). The only difficulty is to avoid the taxi drivers who will tell and repeat to the full that the buses do not get there.

Susa's medina is a fortification with a complex network of alleyways and passageways surrounded by a great wall. Being a coastal city, ancient Susa suffered constant maritime attacks, so the medina was strongly fortified. The walls were built by the aglabíes in 859, and they have a length of almost two and a half kilometers, and a height of 8 meters. If one manages to keep the structure, one can see the exceptional construction, but among all the heap of shops and sellers in search of commission it is difficult to look only at the essential.

Susa's big problem is that, along with Hammamet, it is the most touristic area in Tunisia, not only for all the tourism of the "all-inclusive" packages that comes from Europe, but also for the many Tunisians who go down to those coasts to Enjoy a few days off. The concentration of tourists, shops and vendors is such that the medina ends up losing all its potential charm. In spite of everything, if you are there you can not stop strolling through its streets, look for the 24 mosques inside it and visit the museum of the Kasbah.

On the other hand, a few minutes walk from the Medina of Susa extends Boujaffar beach, where you can take a walk, lie down to sunbathe in its fine white sand or take a bath in its turquoise waters, if you have taken the swimsuit. Anyway, these Mediterranean beaches have nothing to envy to most of Spain's beaches. In fact, if it were not for the French and Arabic spoken in its streets, one can have the sensation of being walking through Salou, Lloret, Benidorm or any other Spanish population focused on beach tourism. It is such a globalized format that one does not even know where it is.

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