Europe

Discovering the Kremlin and the Red Square in Moscow

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Moscow It appeared to us cold and automatic, like the mega-urban that it is. Our train arrived on time to the Leningradsky Vokzal (Ленинградский вокзал) and we had to face the subway that more people absorb from the world, in full rush hour, at the station that receives the thousands of passengers from three adjoining train stations that arrive from the sleeping cities to work in the city. It was not easy to go with the suitcase and enter the tide of people, but we got it.

Just down to the platform, we were amazed by the architecture of Komsomolskaya station (Комсомо́льская), on line 1. The yellow roof contrasts with Soviet-themed mosaics, but it was not time to be delighted. Every minute a meter arrived and hundreds of people went up and down.

Two hostels and a transfer away are the hostel where we stayed in Moscow. It was quite difficult to find well-priced accommodation that had good comments. Accommodation in Moscow is very expensive for the quality offered, so it is very difficult to find a double room for just over 50 euros, even if it is without a bathroom or breakfast. And if you want a bath or breakfast, the price rises to more than 120 euros a night.

He Fresh Hostel It has everything but freshness, which is due to the overcrowding of guests and the lack of ventilation, but at least, our room had a window with mosquito net that faced the street and was very comfortable. We left our things and headed to visit the Kremlin and the Red Square, but first, we got off at the Kitai Gorod metro station (Китай-город), just two stations away from the hostel.

The Kitai Gorod neighborhood It was the first site located outside the walls of the Kremlin to the west. Currently, it is a neighborhood of old buildings that house state agencies. There are also some churches, such as the Zaikonospassky monastery and the epiphany monastery, and historic buildings such as the house of the Romanovs in Zaryadie (house of the future czars of Russia when they were mere nobles) and the Old English Palace, where they stayed the emissaries of Queen Elizabeth I of England when she entered into commercial relations with Ivan the Terrible.

Approaching the Red Square, the neighborhood becomes a boulevard of fashion boutiques of haute couture designers and luxury items in a chic atmosphere. If Marx raised his head ... But let's not fool ourselves, the main attraction of Moscow is the Red Square and the Kremlin. And I admit that until I got there I didn't know very well what is enclosed within its walls.

Since 1147, the Kremlin has been the site of the Russian state. However, in 1812 Peter the Great took the capital to St. Petersburg and was not returned to Moscow until 1917, when Lenin left feet so that I want you to take refuge in the walls of the Kremlin. In fact, kremlin It means "strong square", so it is not surprising that the whole complex is surrounded by huge walls and red watchtowers that have given the name to the square. Until I learned that I had always associated the red color of the square with communism, but I was wrong.

Tickets to visit the Kremlin are sold near the Kutafya tower (Кутафья башня). There is a ticket office on each side of the tower and another in the Alexandrovsky garden, where there is hardly a tail. We knew that after doing more than an hour in line under the sun at two in the afternoon. At the ticket office you can buy tickets for the Kremlin (350 rubles) and for the Armory (700 rubles). In our case, we only bought those from the Kremlin for the price and for the short time we had to visit the place (it closes at 5.30pm).

The Kremlin is accessed through the same tower of Kutafya and, once past the towers, we receive three buildings. One of communist architecture and two classics that house government offices and the Senate. Further, we arrived at an esplanade in which three churches and three cathedrals stand, and that surprised me.

He had mistakenly associated the Kremlin with the Soviet era, when it has been for many more years the seat of czars and ruling princes. So it was not surprising that there were so many churches and cathedrals. With the price of admission you can access all except the bell tower of Ivan the Great.

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