Europe

Excursion to Herculaneum, Vesuvius and margarita pizza

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Our last day in the Campania and we still had to visit the Herculaneum ruins Yes or yes. Yes or yes, because when we left at 10 at the B&B another water tube was falling and this time we were not going to miss the visit even if we had to do it by boat.

Herculaneum is supposedly a 20-minute drive from Pompeii, but the traffic was complicated (even more) due to the rain and we ended up arriving there an hour later. Fortunately, at that time it stopped raining and we could make the visit quietly.

Herculaneum was a small port city of about 4,000 inhabitants that was located closer to Vesuvius and that is why the eruption left the city buried under 16 meters of lava. Although Pompeii is more extensive and monumental, it is worth visiting Herculaneum because that river of pyroclasts caused a conservation phenomenon that did not occur in Pompeii. Apart from conserving organic remains (vegetables, decorative objects and even wood) the upper floors of many buildings were preserved, which allowed us to know what the buildings of the time were like.

Upon arriving at the site, the first thing you find is a small museum where you can visit the wooden boat that was found in 1982, amphorae and explanations about maritime trade.

We access the ruins of Herculaneum through a walkway that crosses over the Fornicis, old warehouses that overlooked the beach and where about three hundred skeletons of people who fled to take refuge there were found waiting to be rescued perhaps, although they died asphyxiated by a 400 degree heat wave.

The city was organized along three decumanos and crossed by five thistles perpendicular to the coast. The good thing about these ruins is that since they are not as popular or as large as those in Pompeii, they can be visited with more calm and tranquility. So we walked through their thistles and decumans, we entered almost all the houses and contemplated their peristyls and columns, we entered the hot springs that still retain their mosaics and we would have taken some vinegars in one of the thermopolishes if they were still in operation.

What is certain is that you can easily move to the time of Emperor Titus and I wonder if they organized Roman weeks there (such as medieval fairs), when people walk dressed in their robes and shops recover the routine of yesteryear ...

When leaving Herculaneum we prepared to go up to the Vesuvius skirt to ascend to its crater. From below it was already seen that the thing would be complicated, because it was all over the top covered by clouds, but we tried anyway. The road that goes from Ercolano (the current Italian town) to Vesuvius is quite complicated, with many curves. When we finally got there after half an hour, we parked, paid € 2.50 for parking and went to the ticket office to buy the entrance to the park, at which time we were informed that there was no visibility, ¡¡niente!

We were a little out of play and not knowing what to do. The organized groups kept going up, but, honestly, paying € 6.50 to give me a two-hour hike under an icy air and get to the top and see nothing, it was not my ideal of fun. Before giving up we asked several people who had just come down and confirmed to us the inevitable, that it was very cold and that once above it was not visible na de na.

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